The more things change….


….the more they remain the same.  Back in 2010 we observed how the IDF was “pimping” its male soldiers by having tourists visit an army base where they can mingle with hot, rugged Israeli male soldiers, and even have their picture taken with them in various states of undress. hello This undertaking was being done with the help of  a former porn actor who was also a supporter of the IDF and thus entitled to cavort on Israeli bases.  Seems Israel doesn’t mind seeing itself as the gay friendly capital of the Middle East.

But wait……let’s not leave out the women  who want to show their support for the IDF.

The Facebook page “Standing With IDF” has gotten quite a bit of attention since it was created on Wednesday, and it’s readily apparent why: the page is littered with bare breasts and butts on which women have written short tributes to the Israeli army, some more stripped down than others but all of them titillating. For the most part, the photos look like intimate selfies that one might “sext” to a partner, but with a handwritten “IDF” and a heart thrown in.

 

The Facebook page has been removed. Perhaps people don’t want to appear too celebratory while committing mass murder in Gaza, but here are some of the images.  Seems there’s more than a healthy dose of sexism and debauchery among Israel’s so-called elite IDF. t&atit for tatTat

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We’re not racists but…


We’ve all heard that one before right?  It’s now the cry given out by European Jews, i.e. white skinned, who don’t want their daughters going to school with more native Jews, read that darker skinned and it’s something straight out of 1950s-60s America.  That just goes to prove how Israel is not the “haven” for equality and goodness it tells so many people it is.  Strange things come out of the mouths of people who want to justify their prejudices.  How about this one for an excuse to keep ones daughters from being in the same school as the others

Esther Bark, 50, who has seven daughters, said the issue is keeping the girls away from the temptations of the modern world. ”To suddenly put them in an open-minded place is not good for them,” she said.

This also goes to show you how some Israelis view womanhood.  Evidently it’s quite alright to keep their daughters in the dark, ignorant, closed minded instead of open minded.  Can we conclude that being barefoot and pregnant won’t be far behind?  So much for being a light unto the nations.  It’s interesting the Ashkhenazi take what could be considered a fascist position and makes me wonder if their mind set more closely resembles their ‘nazi’ brethren of another era in European history.  It would appear Israelis would rather live in the darkness of a bygone era that includes tribalism and racism…..or rather the white Israelis that is.  I don’t understand how it is that elements of Israeli society cling so quickly to such racist tendencies when some of the same people were once at the forefront of a nascent civil rights movement in America…unless what’s good for the goose isn’t always good for the gander.

‘Arab women need not apply’


Israel’s finance minister was accused last week of trying to deflect attention from discriminatory policies keeping many of the country’s Arab families in poverty by blaming their economic troubles on what he described as Arab society’s opposition to women working.

A recent report from Israel’s National Insurance Institute showed that half of all Arab families in Israel are classified as poor compared with just 14 per cent of Jewish families.

Yuval Steinitz, the finance minister, told a conference on employment discrimination this month that the failure of Arab women to participate in the workforce was damaging Israel’s economy. Eighteen per cent of Arab women work, and only half of them full time, compared with at least 55 per cent of Jewish women.

He attributed the low employment rate to “cultural obstacles, traditional frameworks and the belief that Arab women have to remain in their home towns”, adding that such restrictions were characteristic of all Arab societies.

But researchers and women’s groups pointed out that employment of Arab women in Israel is lower than almost anywhere else in the Arab world, including such employment blackspots for women as Saudi Arabia and Oman.

“Most Arab women want to work, including a large number of female graduates, but the government has refused to tackle the many and severe obstacles that have been put in their way,” said Sawsan Shukha of Women Against Violence, a Nazareth-based organisation.

That assessment was supported by a survey this month revealing that 83 per cent of Israeli businesses in the main professions – including advertising, law, banking, accountancy and the media – admitted being opposed to hiring Arab graduates, whether men or women.

Yousef Jabareen, an urban planner at the Technion technical university in Haifa, who has conducted one of the largest surveys on Arab women’s employment in Israel, said the problems Arab women faced were unique.

“In Israel they face a double discrimination, both because they are women and because they are Arabs,” he said.

“The average in the Arab world [for female employment] is about 40 per cent. Only women in Gaza, the West Bank and Iraq – where there are exceptional circumstances – have lower rates of employment than Arab women in Israel. That gap needs explaining and the answers aren’t to be found where the minister is looking.”

He said a wide range of factors hold Arab women back, many of them the result of discriminatory policies by successive governments to prevent the 1.3-million Arab minority, which comprises one-fifth of Israel’s population, from benefiting from economic development.

These included widespread discrimination in hiring policies by both private employers and the government; a long-standing failure to locate industrial zones and factories in Arab communities; a severe lack of state-supported childcare services compared with Jewish communities; a shortage of public transport in Arab areas that prevented women reaching places of work, and a lack of training courses aimed at Arab women.

According to a study by Women Against Violence, 40 per cent of Arab women with degrees are unable to find work. When interviewed, Mr Jabareen said, 78 per cent of non-working women blamed their situation on a lack of job opportunities.

Maali Abu Roumi, 24, from the town of Tamra in northern Israel, has been looking for a job as a social worker since she finished training two years ago. She said cash-strapped Arab schools, unlike Jewish schools, could not afford to employ a social worker, and that Israel’s Arab minority lacked the equivalent of the welfare institutions and foundations funded by wealthy overseas Jews that offered work to many Jewish social workers.

“Most of the Jews I studied with have found work, while very few of the Arabs on my course have been employed,” she said. “When a job comes up, it’s usually part time and there are dozens of applicants.”

The Alternative Planning Centre, an Arab organisation that studies land use in Israel, reported in 2007 that only 3.5 per cent of the country’s industrial zones were in Arab communities. Most attracted such small businesses as workshops for car repairs or carpentry that offered few opportunities for women.

“Israel’s private sector is almost entirely closed to Arab women because of discriminatory practices by employers who prefer to employ Jews,” Mr Jabareen said. He added that the government had failed to provide leadership: among governmental workers, less than two per cent were Arab women, despite repeated pledges by ministers to increase Arab recruitment.

Ms Shukha said: “The civil service is a major employer, but many of these jobs are in the centre of the country, in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem, a long way from the north where most Arab citizens live.”

She noted that there were no regular buses from Nazareth, the largest Arab town in the country, to Jerusalem. “The transport situation is even worse in the villages where most Arab women live.”

In addition, she said, most could not travel long distances to find work because of the scarcity of child-care provision. Only 25 government-run daycare centres have been established for preschool children in Arab communities out of 1,600 operating across the country. Ms Shaukha also criticised the trade and industry ministry, saying that, although it had invested heavily in training for Jewish women, only six per cent of Arab women were attending courses, and then mostly for sewing and secretarial work.

Mr Jabareen said Arab men faced massive discrimination, too, but found work because they filled a need in the economy by doing hard manual labour that most Jews refused, often travelling long distances to work on construction sites. “Women simply don’t have that option,” he said. “They cannot do that kind of work and they need to stay close to their communities because they have responsibilities in the home.”

The Art of Changing Reality


altered_statesYou really have to love how some within the Israeli establishment can change reality to suit their agendas.  In the photo above women who are members of the Israeli government were removed and another photo used with men replacing the legally elected women of the government, because some within Israeli society think it’s not appropriate to have women seen in public.   When Israelis do this kind of thing even to themselves it lets you know how callous they have become, and begs the question, what other alterations have they made for their interests?  In the past, America has invaded countries that casually dismissed women in the manner some within Israeli media have done.  It’s amazing how immobile US policy makers are when it comes to Israeli transgressions!  Stay tuned.