Bad policing-X2


The first story is truly an example of a bad policeman doing his job very, very poorly. I won’t get into the debate whether he should be fired……..hell yes……but should Robert Powell, Dallas police officer have  restrained someone, in this case, Ryan Moats and his wife,  in the parking lot of a hospital to insist they show him proof of insurance on a vehicle Powell knew belonged to Moats while they are trying to see a dying relative?  This is what Powell’s boss had to say

His (Powell)  behavior in my opinion, did not exhibit the common sense, discretion, the compassion that we expect our officers to exhibit.” Kunkle also praised Moats and his family, saying that “They exercised extraordinary patience, restraint, dealing with the behavior of our officer. At no time did Mr. Moats identify himself as an NFL football player or expect any kind of special consideration. He handled himself very, very well.

This is bad policing at its worse.  If Powell wants to be in law enforcement, perhaps he should be a prison guard, where he can get away with bullying  hardened convicts. This other example however is not bad policing as much as bad and dangerous citizenship.  There was a “shoot-out” in Miami between a robber and an armed citizen who was carrying his firearm concealed and legally.  The good news is that the law abiding citizen was legally carrying his firearm.  The bad news is he discharged it in what I consider an irresponsible manner, killing an armed robber and in the process  being severely wounded himself.  John Landers, the legally armed citizen allegedly confronted the armed robber in the Miami Burger King and told him to drop his weapon.  Respectfully, that is NOT Mr. Landers’ job.  His responsibility in carrying his weapon is to defend himself with it and others who may be in imminent danger or serious bodily harm.  It would have been more prudent for Mr. Landers to take cover while concealing himself, assess the situation with his weapon drawn and fire on the robber only if the villain fired at anyone in the store.  An armed citizen engaging in a gun fight inside a busy restaurant with an armed robber who hasn’t yet shot anyone is dangerous, and issues of liability become REAL should innocent bystanders get hit.  As it is, Mr. Landers was hurt and the robber killed.  I have no problem with that outcome; although I would have preferred Mr. Landers not be injured, chest wounds are pretty serious.  Let’s wish him a complete recovery of his wounds and more importantly recovery of common sense for the judicious exercise of his right to keep and bear arms.

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