Cognitive Dissonance-a really practical explanation as it applies to our life in America


This video may be long but it is well worth your time viewing; I have looked at it in its entirety three times since first learning about it.  Dr, Joy DeGruy explains how cognitive dissonance allows us to oppress one another, and especially people of color in ways that still allow us to tout our #AmericanExceptionalism and feel good about it. DeGruy explains cognitive dissonance in terms of post traumatic slave syndrome which is at the heart of our social dysfunction and which we seem simply unable or unwilling to address in any rehabilitative way. As a result we’ve now infected America’s new minorities with this syndrome, our neighbors to the south of us as well as America’s Muslims. What is even worse is the front runners for the #demonicGOP are quite happy to spread this disease to as many as they can in order to get power and continue the oppression in new and even more dastardly ways.  (Income inequality is real people and economic trickle down theories DO NOT work.)

Today may not be the best time but as we approach the fall and winter months and you find yourself confined to your home and are looking for something entertaining, grab your favorite comfort food and sit down and listen to this lecture.  You’ll be glad you did.

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Islam in America


cvrI think it’s very important for Muslims to document their presence in America in order to preserve the legacy of Islam in this country, to pass it on and because quite simply no one else will.  To that end, one community in North Carolina is doing just that with a book that can by purchased online for all to see.

Durham,North Carolina used to be a town known for its tobacco and thriving black middle class.  Situated in the heart of that state, the city is now more commonly known for Duke University with tobacco playing no role at all in the city’s growth or prosperity.  It is also home to a thriving Muslim community that has been active and in existence for many, many decades and which has played a part in the development of that city.  The Athaan in the Bull City, written by Nazeeh Abdul-Hakeem chronicles the growth of Islam in Durham, North Carolina from a very personal perspective; it is devoid the polemics commonly associated with a discussion of Islam in this country and speaks solely of that city’s Muslims building an institution that could be viable for Muslims living in that town.  It should be required reading for America’s Muslims and a template to use for other locales to document their own presence in America.