Whose Hallowed Ground is it anyway?


All the fascists assembled together in the studios of FoxNews  crowing about the hallowed ground at Park51 that shouldn’t have an Islamic Center built on it forgot to lament the building of the World Trade Centers on the hallowed ground which is the burial site for scores of Muslim African slaves interred there since the time New York City was known as Amsterdam city.

Before the World Trade Center was even designed (with Islamic architectural elements, incidentally), the ground was indeed sacrosanct: The bones of some 20,000 African slaves are buried 25 feet below Lower Manhattan. As at least 10 percent of West African slaves in America were Muslims, it’s not out of bounds to extrapolate that ground zero itself was built on the bones of at least a few Muslim slaves. That is to say, hallowed Muslim ground.

Not that such knowledge will stop the “Deniers” as one friend calls them, from making the rounds with constitutionally protected speech  whereby they espouse unconstitutional measures against Muslims.

David Yerushalmi, (who) is an advocate for criminalizing Islam itself and imposing 20-year sentences on practicing Muslims. Yes, really. He’s not simply anti-Muslim, though; Yerushalmi also wrote a now-infamous article titled “On Race: A Tentative Discussion, Part II,” in which he advocated a return to a pre-Bill of Rights Constitution, and the restriction of voting rights to white male land-owners.

On a positive note, the Boston Globe had an excellent piece on the Quran in American history which should really dispel the notion that Islam is something strange and unfamiliar on the shores of America.

As usual, the Founders were way ahead of us. They thought hard about how to build a country of many different faiths. And to advance that vision to the fullest, they read the Koran, and studied Islam with a calm intelligence that today’s over-hyped Americans can only begin to imagine. They knew something that we do not. To a remarkable degree, the Koran is not alien to American history — but inside it….

Reports of Korans in American libraries go back at least to 1683, when an early settler of Germantown, Pa., brought a German version to these shores. Despite its foreign air, Adams’s Koran had a strong New England pedigree. The first Koran published in the United States, it was printed in Springfield in 1806.

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