Bin Laden’s right hand man released in Britain


It seems kind of strange reading a headline about someone associated with bin Laden being released from prison during the same week American politicians are calling for his head. Abu Qatada seems to have as many lives as a cat.  He’s been arrested three times, escaped from prison twice and is now being allowed out of prison on bail.  Living in Britain illegally for many years, the government of Britain has even been stifled in their attempts to deport him to his native Jordan.  Qatada was once known as “Osama bin Laden’s right-hand man in Europe” is now free and this observer can’t understand why?  Hundreds of people less involved with al-Qaida and bin Laden are languishing in Guantanamo Bay for years with no end in sight, yet Qatada has gone free AGAIN, and beaten all attempts  at imprisoning or deporting him.  How does that happen?

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Islamic law is good enough for Blackwater


I found this headline in a local paper and was surprised. I thought the neocon right, represented by companies such as KBR, Halliburton, Blackwater, et.al were supposed to help the US in the war on terror. Instead, Blackwater is looking for divine intervention with the help of Islamic law?

To defend itself against a lawsuit by the widows of three American soldiers who died on one of its planes in Afghanistan, a sister company of the private military firm Blackwater has asked a federal court to decide the case using the Islamic law known as Shari’a.

The lawsuit “is governed by the law of Afghanistan,” Presidential Airways argued in a Florida federal court. “Afghan law is largely religion-based and evidences a strong concern for ensuring moral responsibility, and deterring violations of obligations within its borders.”

If the judge agrees, it would essentially end the lawsuit over a botched flight supporting the U.S. military. Shari’a law does not hold a company responsible for the actions of employees performed within the course of their work.

So does this mean Islam isn’t so bad after all?